• September 9, 2021 - 11:32 AM A Message from the Dean, in Remembrance of 9/11

    By The Right Reverend Clifton Daniel III - 0 Comments

  • July 19, 2021 - 11:59 AM A Message on the Continued Resumption of In-Person Services

    0 Comments

  • May 9, 2021 - 11:17 PM A Message from the Dean, the Chapter and Clergy: Resumption of In-Person Services

    0 Comments

  • April 20, 2021 - 12:08 PM Statement from the Cathedral on the Trial of Derek Chauvin

    0 Comments

  • April 4, 2021 - 10:44 AM An Easter Message From the Dean

    By The Right Reverend Clifton Daniel III - 0 Comments

    How and when do we look for Jesus in our lives? The story of Mary Magdalene gives us a clue.

  • November 29, 2020 - 3:30 PM An Advent Message from the Dean

    By The Right Reverend Clifton Daniel III - 0 Comments

  • March 17, 2020 - 4:52 PM How do we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land

    By The Right Reverend Clifton Daniel III - 0 Comments

    Click to read more

  • April 18, 2019 - 4:08 PM An Easter Message from the Dean

    By The Right Reverend Clifton Daniel III - 1 Comment

    Read more

  • January 4, 2019 - 10:29 AM An Epiphany Message from the Dean

    By The Right Reverend Clifton Daniel III - 0 Comments

    These Wise Ones (perhaps more correct for our time) were alert to the appearance of a new star in their everyday life and were determined to find out what it meant. The second thing we know about them is that they had the imagination to see God amid the routine of their lives and they possessed the curiosity to follow wherever that might lead. And they found the Treasure! They were called wise because they listened: to their dreams, to the routine of their everyday lives and to the world around them. The Wise Ones were also adaptable. They didn't sit in one place - they got up and moved. They were willing to explore and take risks, to head off in a new direction. They were able to let their goals and their work change to fit new moments. The Wise Ones asked questions; only unwise people...

    Click here to read more

  • December 2, 2018 - 12:00 AM An Advent Message from the Dean

    0 Comments

    One evening, as young Robert stood watching with fascination, his parents asked him, “Robert, what in the world are you looking at out there?” With great excitement he exclaimed, “Look at that man! He’s punching holes in the darkness!” There is plenty of darkness in our our time – the darkness of poverty, illness, hunger, violence, prejudice, hatred, homelessness. The Christmas message is that holes can be punched in the darkness to let the light in. Jesus Christ came to punch holes in the darkness of the world’s suffering and pain and to punch holes in indifference to the hurt of the world and its people – in order to let the light of a divine love shine through. That is the very light of Christmas that Phillips Brooks points to in his hymn, “O Little Town of Bethlehem.” Brooks w...

    Read more

  • May 20, 2018 - 12:00 AM A Pentecost Message from the Dean

    0 Comments

    Here’s the picture: It is not long after Jesus’s resurrection. His disciples were huddled in a room. Suddenly there comes a sound of rushing wind, and tongues of fire settle on their heads. Who wouldn’t have run out of there and into the street? Further amazement follows for the disciples and teeming crowds: the disciples of Jesus began to speak a new language that at first sounded like drunken babbling – but then all those in the street realized they could understand clearly what the disciples were saying. They were hearing the Good News of the resurrection of Jesus Christ in their own language. Now, in the Hebrew Scripture the story of the Tower of Babel tells a tale of the origin of different languages. But in this moment on the streets of Jerusalem, that story was reversed. Every...

    Read more

  • April 1, 2018 - 12:00 AM An Easter Message from the Dean

    0 Comments

    Looking to the past may be an adventure of nostalgia for some. For others, looking to the past may be a painful journey into old hurts, fears, difficulties. Looking to the past as a place to dwell in safety from the rigors of the present will end either in cynicism or unreality. This was the stance of the Chief Priests and religious leaders in Jerusalem during the events of what we now call Holy Week. True, we carry the past with us always. Choosing to live there, casting a blind eye to the present and its challenges may be tempting, but is ultimately a dead-end choice. Looking only to the future may be a hopeful enterprise, tempting us to use hope for the future as an escape hatch from the realities of the present: Bad as the present is, things can only get better, right? To be a po...

    Read more

  • February 14, 2018 - 12:00 AM An Ash Wednesday Message from the Dean

    0 Comments

    I recently saw a wonderful explanation of Lent on Facebook, written by Juan Oliver, who is the Custodian of the Standard Book of Common Prayer. Fr. Oliver reminds us that Easter is such a great event in our Christian life that "it takes six weeks just to get ready for it, not because otherwise we would not be worthy of it, but because, well, it’s the greatest feast of the year, and like a wedding, one doesn’t just show up in flip-flops, ring in hand. "So we do our own housecleaning, externally and internally, and even as communities. We ask ourselves, How might we be more like the person God loves? Where am I forgetting that I am loved by the very Ground of my being, —that I, along with all creation, am the product of an irrepressible divine urge to joyfully and lovingly create beyon...

    Read more

  • January 6, 2018 - 12:00 AM An Epiphany Message from the Dean

    0 Comments

    The Magi appear only in the Gospel of Matthew’s account of events surrounding the birth of Jesus. It is not entirely clear whether the Gospel author was using the appearance of the Magi as a literary device or whether the account of the visit refers to an actual event. The Gospels are written not as newspaper accounts but as theological documents pointing to the coming of God as a human being to visit and redeem a lost and broken humanity. The Wise Ones in Matthew’s Gospel are described as stargazers, astronomers/astrologers who closely watched the heavens for signs. Observing the heavens was the Wise Ones’ workaday world and they paid close attention! Part of the meaning of the account of the Wise Ones visit for you and me and our daily life, is the importance of taking seriously...

    Read more

  • December 19, 2017 - 12:00 AM A Christmas Message from the Dean

    0 Comments

    Christmas means many things to each of us, from the sentimental to the sacred. Most of us fall somewhere in between, for truth be known, these are not mutually exclusive poles; Christmas, for most of us, is a blend of both – a season of memories, a season of merriment, perhaps sorrows, and a season of adoration. Celebrating Christmas takes place on a spectrum of realities, all mixed and blended together in unique ways, tailored to the contours of our life, our joys and sorrows. But Christmas means more than the simple sum of our experiences. The birth narratives of the Christ child point to three great themes. Each one of the Gospel themes expresses a facet of the Christmas story: Christmas is a season of friendship. In Christmas, God is demonstrating divine friendship toward e...

    Read more

  • September 6, 2017 - 12:00 AM Immigration and Sanctuary Support from the Cathedral

    0 Comments

    The Cathedral is open to all who wish to enter our sacred space regardless of immigration status. Ongoing Resources & Support Clergy conversations Members of the clergy are available for confidential conversations about all sorts of topics, including immigration status. If you or someone you know wants to speak with someone about questions of immigration status, recently announced changes in DACA, or any other personal or spiritual subject, the Cathedral and its clergy provide a safe pace where they can talk. What is said in those conversations will never be shared. (Text adapted from the Rev. Mariclair Partee Carlsen) Sanctuary resources If you are worried about your immigration status or are wondering about ways in which you can help those who are, the Diocese of New York i...

    Read more

  • August 13, 2017 - 12:00 AM A Statement from the Dean on the Violence in Charlottesville, VA

    0 Comments

    The message of hatred and exclusion such as we have seen expressed and acted out in Charlottesville since Friday night is contrary to the Gospel we proclaim. The message of hatred proclaimed by right wing groups points to an ugly streak of hatred that lives in the soul of this country. I am saddened beyond words that the sin of hate-driven violence persists in our national life. As a Christian and as an American I am ashamed to see Nazi salutes and slogans used and anti-Semitic chants voiced at the white nationalist rallies. In the video clips of the rallies shown in the media, most of those participating appear to be young white males carrying torches in a style reminiscent of Ku Klux Klan gatherings in this nation in the last century in this country and Nazi rallies in Germany in t...

    Read more

  • June 4, 2017 - 12:00 AM A Pentecost Message from the Dean

    0 Comments

    I have learned that the people who make up this community we call “the Cathedral” are some of the most committed I have ever met. The list is a long one – the Vergers and Acolytes, Lectors, Ushers, Choristers and Musicians, Maintenance and Security staff, Cathedral clergy staff – and the list could go on. Some members of the staff make personal or financial sacrifices to work here. You who form the community of the Cathedral give in gracious and generous ways of your talent, treasure and time. All believe strongly in the mission of the Cathedral and its voice and work in the life of the surrounding community and city. On Memorial Day, the New York Philharmonic offered its 26th annual free concert at the Cathedral with Alan Gilbert, in his last season, conducting and over 2,500 in attend...

    Read more

  • April 15, 2017 - 12:00 AM An Easter Message from the Acting Dean

    0 Comments

    Incredible as it may at first appear, the story of Jesus’s resurrection from death is not a work of fiction. The resurrection story relates a miracle that has meaning for every human life: Jesus, crucified, dead and buried is raised from the dead, given a new and eternal life, and promises that all people and the whole creation will eternally share in that new life. The miracle of Easter is not some divine magic trick. Magic creates an illusion that, while believable to the eye, is ultimately an illusion. Jesus performed many miracles in the Gospels – changing water into wine at a wedding feast (John), healing a sick child (Mark), giving sight to a blind man (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John), and finally raising Lazarus from the grave (John). All were miracles. None of them were magic....

    Read more

  • January 6, 2017 - 12:00 AM An Epiphany Message from the Dean

    0 Comments

    The three wise men became known as the three kings, however the scriptures do not call them kings but magus, from the Greek name given by the Babylonians, Medes and Persians to wise men, teachers, priests, physicians, astrologers, seers, interpreters of dreams, augers, soothsayers and sorcerers. Matthew tells us that the Magi followed a star, which suggest that they were astrologers and not royalty. They are described as kings in later Christian writings, possibly referring to Psalm 72:11, “May all kings fall down before him.” They showed up and fell on their knees. That act of faith and worship became a sign across generations that God was up to something marvelous in what they discovered in that stable. And in their commitment and homage, the Magi became a symbol to the wide reach...

    Read more